Posts for: November, 2013

By Advance Family Dental Care
November 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TreatingChippedTeethACommonSportsInjuryAmongKids

One went over the handlebars of his mountain bike. Another got an elbow going for a lay-up. For a third, it was that tricky maneuver on her new snowboard...

These are just a few of the ways that kids' teeth can be injured. (No doubt, parents can think of plenty more.) The good news is that modern dentistry offers more options than ever for treating the injury and restoring the appearance and function of the teeth.

Teeth that are fractured or dislodged are a serious condition that requires immediate, comprehensive treatment. The majority of dental injuries, however, are less severe: most often, they involve chipped teeth. If chips occur in the upper front teeth — as some 80% of dental injuries do — even small flaws can have a big affect on the appearance. And, especially in the teenage years, appearance can mean everything.

In many cases, small chips in the teeth can be repaired effectively using a procedure called “bonding.” In this treatment, we use a tooth-colored material made by mixing a plastic matrix and a glass-like filler, which provides adequate strength and aesthetic qualities similar to the natural teeth. In fact, this composite material can be matched to an individual's tooth color so accurately that it's hard to notice any difference.

Composite resins can be successfully bonded to most healthy teeth — and they offer some advantages over other restoration methods, particularly for children and teenagers. The bonding procedure avoids making tiny “undercuts” in the natural substance of the tooth, while metal fillings need to “lock in” to the tooth's structure. This means that bondings generally require less tooth preparation, which usually makes bonding a quick and relatively easy method of restoration.

It's true that, over time, some bonded restorations may not stand up to the tremendous biting forces of the jaw as well as porcelain restorations — but in young people whose permanent teeth have large pulp (nerve) chambers, the removal of too much tooth structure could compromise the long-term health of the tooth. Later on, we can look at performing a different type of restoration.

If you have questions about cosmetic bonding or sports-related dental injuries, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
November 22, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Naperville IL Cosmetic DentistHave you ever noticed yourself yawning after seeing a friend or family member yawn? Recent research suggests that yawning may be contagious, and it also may be a sign of social empathy and emotional bonds. We think the same can be said about smiling. Sometimes you meet people who have the most infectious smiles, so you can’t help but smile when you are around them. Smiling also helps others gauge your personality or current mood. At Advanced Family Dental Care, we give you three big reasons why smiling is important!
 

Smiling and Social Perception

People find it easier to approach another person who is smiling. Most perceive it as an invitation to converse and socialize. A full smile portrays your confidence, so you can easily meet new people and develop lasting friendships.
 

Smiling and Success

When you meet a person for the first time, you typically assess their body language and appearance. It’s a natural way for you to get a sense of a person’s personality. In regards to your professional life, a smile helps convey confidence and a go-to attitude. Show employers and coworkers your open and dependable smile, and you will have a positive outlook for your future.
 

Smiling and Happiness

Smiling is one of the best tools you have. It’s powerful, so don’t just smile when you feel happy—smile to be happier. Studies have shown that people who smile more have a positive attitude in all aspects of their life, according to Psychology Today.
 
We can all agree that smiling is beneficial. However, some people feel self-conscious about smiling because of tooth problems. From whitening to dental implants in Naperville, Dr. Pirooz Zomorrodi, cosmetic dentist in Naperville, improves patients’ smiles, so they have something to truly smile about.
 
Do you want to improve your smile? Talk to Dr. Pirooz Zomorrodi about some of his leading cosmetic services. 

By Advance Family Dental Care
November 18, 2013
Category: Oral Health
FluorideisaProvenWeaponintheFightAgainstToothDecay

In the early 1900s, a Colorado dentist noticed many of his patients had unusual brown staining on their teeth — and little to no tooth decay. What he unknowingly observed was the power of a chemical substance in his patients' drinking water — fluoride. While commonplace today, fluoride sparked a revolution — and some controversy — in dental care during the 20th Century.

After decades of research and testing, most dentists now agree that fluoride reduces decay by interfering with the disease process. The optimum pH level for the mouth is neutral; however, this environment constantly changes as we eat, especially if we ingest foods or beverages high in acidity. A high acid level softens tooth enamel (a process called de-mineralization) and can lead to erosion if not neutralized. In addition, a thin layer of bacteria-rich plaque called biofilm that adheres to tooth surfaces is also acidic and is the cause of tooth decay, possibly more so in teeth made more susceptible from enamel erosion.

When fluoride is in “the right place” (present on the tooth surface and in our saliva, the body's natural acid neutralizer), it helps inhibit de-mineralization and aids in the re-hardening of the enamel (re-mineralization).

Although fluoride needs to come into direct contact with tooth enamel for optimum effectiveness, ingesting it can also prove beneficial. The fluoride we ingest eventually becomes deposited in bone. As bone grows and changes it releases this reserved fluoride back into the bloodstream where it eventually becomes part of saliva; the saliva brings it into contact with tooth surfaces.

The two most prominent ways we encounter fluoride are through fluoridated drinking water and in toothpaste. There continues to be concerns about what constitutes safe levels of fluoride in drinking water and over possible side effects like teeth staining and changes in bone structure. However, extensive studies have conclusively shown that even minimal levels of water fluoridation and the use of fluoride toothpaste have reduced tooth decay.

As the Colorado dentist discovered over a hundred years ago, fluoride is truly remarkable as a cavity fighter. Whether you have access to fluoridated water or not, we encourage you to use fluoride toothpaste to strengthen your teeth against decay.

If you would like more information on fluoride, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fluoride & Fluoridation in Dentistry.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
November 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
GeorgeWashingtonsFalseTeeth

Everyone knows that George Washington wore false teeth. Quick, now, what were our first President's dentures made of?

Did you say wood? Along with the cherry tree, that's one of the most persistent myths about the father of our country. In fact, Washington had several sets of dentures — made of gold, hippopotamus tusk, and animal teeth, among other things — but none of them were made of wood.

Washington's dental troubles were well documented, and likely caused some discomfort through much of his life. He began losing teeth at the age of 22, and had only one natural tooth remaining when he took office. (He lost that one before finishing his first term.) Portraits painted several years apart show scars on his cheeks and a decreasing distance between his nose and chin, indicating persistent dental problems.

Dentistry has come a long way in the two-and-a-half centuries since Washington began losing his teeth. Yet edentulism — the complete loss of all permanent teeth — remains a major public health issue. Did you know that 26% of U.S. adults between 65 and 74 years of age have no natural teeth remaining?

Tooth loss leads to loss of the underlying bone in the jaw, making a person seem older and more severe-looking (just look at those later portraits of Washington). But the problems associated with lost teeth aren't limited to cosmetic flaws. Individuals lacking teeth sometimes have trouble getting adequate nutrition, and may be at increased risk for systemic health disorders.

Fortunately, modern dentistry offers a number of ways that the problem of tooth loss can be overcome. One of the most common is still — you guessed it — removable dentures. Prosthetic teeth that are well-designed and properly fitted offer an attractive and practical replacement when the natural teeth can't be saved. Working together with you, our office can provide a set of dentures that feel, fit, and function normally — and look great too.

There are also some state-of-the art methods that can make wearing dentures an even better experience. For example, to increase stability and comfort, the whole lower denture can be supported with just two dental implants placed in the lower jaw. This is referred to as an implant supported overdenture. This approach eliminates the need for dental adhesives, and many people find it boosts their confidence as well.

If you have questions about dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Removable Full Dentures” and “Implant Overdentures for the Lower Jaw.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
November 06, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
ArePorcelainLaminateVeneersRightForYou

Porcelain laminate veneers are one of the innovative techniques dentistry has developed for restoring teeth to improve their color and shape so that they look as good as or better than the originals.

What are porcelain veneers? Porcelain is a ceramic material that is baked in a high-heat oven until it becomes glass-like. Your grandmother's antique china teacups are probably made of porcelain. Dental porcelains are especially made to perfectly mimic the color, reflectivity and translucency of natural tooth enamel. A veneer is a covering or shell, a false front; dental porcelains can be fashioned into veneers used to restore the enamel surfaces of teeth.

What is a laminate? A laminate is a structure created by uniting two or more layers of material together. Dental porcelain laminate veneers refer to the combination of tooth enamel bonding material and porcelain veneer.

When are porcelain laminate veneers used? Porcelain veneers are used to enhance the color of stained, darkened, decayed and heavily restored teeth. They are also used to: correct spaces between teeth; straighten slightly rotated teeth; correct problems in tooth shape and some bite problems. They can be good solutions for broken teeth or teeth that have been worn by habitual tooth grinding.

What is the process of placing the veneers? Room generally needs to be created to place a veneer; generally requiring about half a millimeter of reduction of tooth enamel. Artistic dental laboratory technicians fabricate veneers. About a week of laboratory time is usually needed to construct your veneers.

How do I know whether I will like the way my new veneers look? Computer imaging can be used to digitally replicate your teeth and create images of the proposed changes. Models of your teeth can be cast and changes can be made in white wax for your preview. Temporary veneers can also be fabricated as a test drive before the final veneers are fabricated.

How long will porcelain veneers last? Veneers can last 20 years or more. They are very strong but like glass, they can break if extreme force is applied to them. You should avoid such activities as opening bottles, cracking nuts, or biting into candy apples with your veneers.

How do I look after my new veneers? Once the veneers are placed, you should continue daily brushing and flossing. There is no higher incidence of decay around them than with your natural teeth. However, the more dental work you have in your mouth, the more vigilant you need to be. Of course, keeping your sugar consumption low helps to protect all of your teeth from decay.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about porcelain laminate veneers. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smile Design Enhanced with Porcelain Veneers.”




Naperville, IL Dentist
Advance Family Dental Care
1567 N Aurora Road, Ste 143
Naperville, IL 60563
(630) 358-9899
Dentist in Naperville, IL Call For Pricing

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