Posts for: May, 2014

By Advance Family Dental Care
May 29, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
UnderstandingtheProcessofDentalImplants

If you’ve been reviewing tooth replacement options, you probably already know the superior benefits of dental implants: their durability, functionality and life-like quality could provide you with years, even decades of satisfying service.

If you take this option, however, you should be prepared for a slightly longer process than a couple of office visits. From concept to permanent crown placement, it will require several months of preparation, expertise and teamwork. The more you know about this process, the better prepared you’ll be to handle it.

After careful preparation, which may include extracting the tooth being replaced, the process begins in earnest with the surgical placement of the implant’s titanium post into the jawbone. The surgeon uses a guide based on your bite and mouth structure to precisely implant the post in a pre-planned location: this ensures that the permanent crown will be affixed in the right location for best appearance and functionality.

While a temporary crown can sometimes be attached immediately after implantation, the permanent crown must wait until the bone grows and attaches around the titanium post (osseointegration). Once this has occurred, usually over several months, the implant can fully support the permanent crown and its function.

This last element, the permanent crown, is in many ways a work of art. Taking into consideration the patient’s facial features and shape, the type of tooth replaced and the tooth coloring natural to the patient which is transmitted this information to the dental technician who will manufacture the crown. The goal is to produce a life-like replica that will look natural and perform well.

It may seem quite involved, but all these stages are necessary for a successful outcome. Although dental implants take careful attention and time, the outcome is worth it. In the end you’ll not only recover lost function, you’ll also have a new, transformed smile.

If you would like more information on the procedures for placing dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Evaluating Your Professional Options for Care.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
May 21, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crown  
WhatsYourCrownMadeOf

Like the ones worn by kings and queens of old, dental crowns were traditionally made of that most “royal” of metals: solid gold. This style of crown is still going strong after over a hundred years, but recent advances may have stolen some of its luster. Want to learn more about the different materials from which crowns can be made? Read on!

Gold crowns have stood the test of time, and many still consider them the best. Gold is one of the earliest materials to be successfully used for making crowns, and when properly done, it also lasts the longest: over 50 years in some cases. For these and other reasons, many dentists prefer to get gold restorations for their own teeth.

But in recent years, the use of gold crowns has been in decline — especially when the crown is for one of the front teeth. Why? In one word: aesthetics! With the advent of porcelain and porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns, many people have opted to go with these more natural-colored tooth restorations.

PFM restorations have been in use for some four decades. They combine the strength of precious metals (gold or platinum) with the appeal of a finish that appears more like a natural tooth. With proper care, a PFM restoration may have a functional life of around 20 years.

With their pearly luster and semi-translucent sheen, all-porcelain crowns have an incredibly lifelike appearance. Porcelain itself is a glass-like material, which is specially modified to add strength when it's used in dentistry. In the past, there were some problems with brittleness in all-porcelain restorations. Today, newer formulations have been designed to avoid these issues.

High-tech materials that have recently become available to dentistry include a polycrystalline ceramic substance called zirconium dioxide or “Zirconia.” It shows great promise in terms of aesthetics and strength, and is the subject of much ongoing research. One day, it may replace other materials and become the new “gold standard” of crowns.

Depending on the particular situation, one or more of these materials may be considered for your crown.

If you would like more information about crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers” and “Gold or Porcelain Crowns?”


By Advance Family Dental Care
May 13, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   pregnancy  
MakeOralHealthcareaPriorityDuringPregnancy

A woman during pregnancy naturally pays close attention to her general health, instinctively knowing it affects her developing baby. Ironically, it's also common for a woman during pregnancy to neglect her dental health, due to new physical restraints and fatigue that make regular tasks more difficult and tiring.

But pregnancy is no time to drop your guard: due to hormonal changes, a woman is more susceptible to disease and tooth decay. This can lead to increased sensitivity and gum inflammation that may develop into what's known as pregnancy gingivitis. This is of great concern during pregnancy, as the oral bacteria responsible for gum disease can cross over from mother to baby through the placenta. This could cause an inflammatory response by the mother's body that might result in a preterm birth with a low birth weight for the baby.

There are some things you should do to maintain vigilance. First, you should schedule an appointment with us at the beginning of your pregnancy to discuss and prepare a dental care plan. We can advise you more fully about how pregnancy affects your dental health and what we can both do about it.

A healthy diet from the beginning and throughout pregnancy will provide your child with the nutritional building blocks for his or her developing teeth, which begin to form around the sixth week. You may also develop cravings for certain foods, especially sugary or starchy snacks, which increase your risk of tooth decay. If at all possible, try to limit your intake of these kinds of foods or substitute raw fruits, vegetables or dairy products instead.

Oral hygiene is critical during this time in your life. Daily gentle brushing with a soft bristle toothbrush and flossing will help reduce the level of bacteria that causes gum inflammation. And, if you do notice sensitivity, swelling or bleeding from the gums, you should visit us as soon as possible for examination and treatment. It's also very important during your pregnancy that you schedule regular cleaning appointments. Because of hormonal changes, it's common for gum inflammation to become exaggerated making you more vulnerable to bone loss.

Remember: caring for your oral health when you are pregnant is just as important for your baby as it is for you.

If you would like more information on the relationship between pregnancy and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Pregnancy and Oral Health.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
May 05, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
50CentHasHisOwnStyle-EveninHisSmile

On his way to the top of the urban contemporary charts, the musician, actor and entrepreneur known as 50 Cent (born Curtis James Jackson III) earned his street credibility the hard way; his rise from youthful poverty to present-day stardom is chronicled in many of his rhymes. So when it came time for the rapper to have cosmetic work performed on his teeth, he insisted on doing it in his own way.

“I told [the dentist] to leave [my front teeth] a little bigger than the other ones, because I need to still see me when I look in the mirror,” he told his co-host on the New York radio station Power 105.1. “Don't give me no whole ’noter guy — I like me!”

We understand how 50 Cent feels — in fact, we think it's a perfectly reasonable request.

Cosmetic dentistry has come a long way in recent years, as we strive to meet the increasing expectations of our patients. We realize that different people have different perceptions of what makes a smile attractive — and that in dental aesthetics, beauty really is in the eye of the beholder. That's why, before we begin cosmetic work, we want to hear what you like and don't like about your smile as it is now. In addition, we can also perform what is called a “smile analysis.”

This procedure doesn't cause any discomfort — but it's a crucial part of cosmetic enhancement. In doing the analysis, we look at the various parts of an individual's smile: the spacing, size and alignment of the teeth; the health and position of the gum line; the relationship of the upper and lower jaws; and the relative shape and size of the face. All of these features combine to make a person's smile unique. By looking at them closely, we can help determine the best way for you to improve your smile.

But how can you tell if the cosmetic changes you're contemplating will end up being just right for you? Fortunately, with today's technology, it's easier than ever. Computer imaging offers a chance to visualize the final outcome before we start working on your teeth; it's even possible to offer previews of different treatment options. If you want to go a bit further, we may be able to show you a full-scale model of your new smile.

In some situations, we can even perform a provisional restoration — that is, a trial version of the new smile, made with less permanent materials. If the “temporary” smile looks, feels, and functions just right, then the permanent one will too. If not, it's still possible to make changes that will make it work even better.

Whether you're thinking about having teeth whitening, cosmetic bonding, porcelain veneers, or dental implants to improve your smile, you probably have a picture in your mind of how the end result should look. Will your teeth be perfectly even and “Hollywood white” — or more “natural,” with slight variations in size, spacing and color allowed? Either way, we can help you get the smile you've always wanted.

If you would like more information about smile makeovers and options in cosmetic dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
May 02, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   x-rays  
ConeBeamCTBringsThree-DimensionalViewstoX-RayImaging

There’s no question that x-ray imaging has transformed how we diagnose and treat dental problems. But traditional x-rays have at least one limitation — they are two-dimensional portraits that can only provide a portion of the information available. If you could view the interior of teeth or other mouth structures in three dimensions, you would have access to more detail about their conditions.

Computerized axial tomography (CAT) scanning has brought that third dimensional view to physicians generally and, in more recent years, to dentists. The latest development in this technology is known as Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). A CBCT emits a spiral of x-rays that form a cone-shaped beam that is caught on detectors. Using digital geometry, the CBCT then generates a three-dimensional image by precisely “layering” this large series of two-dimensional images caught by the detectors on top of each other.

CBCT is already making a significant impact in dentistry and its related specialties. Dentists now can visualize with amazingly precise detail the three-dimensional anatomy of the teeth, jaws, facial bone and other structures in the head and neck area. Orthodontists can examine the growth stages of a patient’s teeth eruption to better prepare treatment strategies. Oral surgeons can determine the precise location of impacted teeth and their exact proximity to nerves and sinuses. And, periodontists who specialize in gum disease and treatment can better determine the level of bone loss and gum attachment for more accurate diagnoses and effective treatment.

While a CBCT delivers a higher dose of x-rays than a traditional panoramic radiograph, it actually delivers a lower dosage than a digital standard 18 film full mouth series or than conventional medical CT scanners. The field of view also determines the level of x-ray exposure — the smaller the field of view (and more concentrated the x-rays) the higher the dosage and the better detail of anatomy.

The good news, though, is that a low dosage CBCT scan can still provide a level of detail that can provide dentists with a very accurate view of anatomical features, including bone density and mass, in three dimensions. That capability can vastly elevate the accuracy of diagnoses and lay the groundwork for effective dental treatment.

If you would like more information on the uses of CBCT scanning to help you maintain dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “CAT Scans in Dentistry.”




Naperville, IL Dentist
Advance Family Dental Care
1567 N Aurora Road, Ste 143
Naperville, IL 60563
(630) 358-9899
Dentist in Naperville, IL Call For Pricing

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