Posts for: November, 2014

By Advance Family Dental Care
November 19, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TreatingKidsSports-RelatedDentalInjuries

They work hard, and put in lots of time on the field and at home. They learn the rules of the game — as well as the unwritten rules of sportsmanship and teamwork. They receive the proper training, and wear appropriate protective equipment. But sometimes, in spite of everything, kids who participate in sports can be subject to injury. Fortunately, in today's dentistry there are a variety of treatments, as well as preventive measures, which can help.

When faced with serious dental injury, time is of the essence in saving teeth. So, don't delay — come in to see us immediately! If treated promptly, it's possible for teeth which have been dislodged — or even knocked out of the mouth — to be put back in position and stabilized. Afterwards, follow-up treatment will ensure that the tooth has the best chance of recovery.

The treatment of kids' dental injuries is sometimes different than that of adults. For example, in adults, a root canal would generally be necessary, followed by a tooth restoration (crown). But some kids may not need this treatment, since their teeth are still developing. Also, replacing a missing primary (baby) tooth may not be recommended, since it may hinder development of the permanent teeth. Based on his or her individual circumstances, we can develop an appropriate treatment plan for your child.

Luckily, the most common dental injuries aren't nearly as serious — they typically involve chipped or cracked teeth. Most can be repaired by reattaching the broken piece, or using a tooth-colored restoration. If a large part of the structure of a permanent tooth is missing, a crown or “cap” may be placed on the visible part, above the gum line. Smaller chips, even in primary teeth, can be successfully repaired by cosmetic bonding with composite resin materials.

Finally, if your child is involved in athletic activities — or if you are — consider obtaining a custom-made mouthguard. Numerous studies have shown that this protective gear can help prevent many dental injuries. Unlike the off-the-shelf types found in some sporting-goods stores, the ones we provide are individually fabricated from an exact model of the teeth. They're strong, fit comfortably, and offer superior protection at a reasonable cost.

If you have questions about the treatment of sports-related dental injuries, or about mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “Mouthguards.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
November 11, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   tooth decay  
5QuestionstoAskYourselfAboutYourRiskforToothDecay

Among our most common diseases, tooth decay can be a big problem at any age: in the U.S., one in four children 5 and under has some form of the disease, as well as ninety percent of those 60 and older — and a quarter of those have suffered complete tooth loss.

Fortunately, we now know what needs to be done on a regular basis to prevent tooth decay. Unfortunately, many are uninformed about all they need to do to lower their risk.

Here, then, are 5 questions to ask yourself to see if you’re on the right prevention path or not.

Do I brush and floss daily? If not, you’re aiding and abetting the “enemy” — bacteria that cause tooth decay. Bacteria that make up plaque feed on any food remnants that adhere to tooth surfaces. Brushing at least once daily (twice is better) removes plaque, while flossing removes plaque between teeth that can’t be reached with a brush. Removing plaque will lower your mouth’s acid levels that cause a loss of minerals to the enamel surface.

Do I use the proper techniques for brushing and flossing? While it’s important to establish daily hygiene habits, if you’re not performing them properly you won’t realize the full benefit from your efforts. But don’t dismay — we can train you in the proper techniques for brushing and flossing your teeth.

Do I use fluoride toothpaste? This naturally-occurring chemical strengthens tooth enamel and makes it more resistant to decay. You can increase fluoride’s absorption rate into enamel by using hygiene products that contain it.

Do I constantly snack between meals? Saliva neutralizes acid remaining in the mouth after eating in about 30 to 60 minutes. If you’re constantly snacking or sipping acidic beverages, however, saliva can’t do this effectively. It’s best to limit snacking to a few, specific times and restrict acidic beverages to meal time only.

Do I visit the dentist for cleanings and checkups? While brushing and flossing reduce plaque, it can’t remove it from hard-to-reach places below the gums or harder deposits (calculus) that have developed. A professional cleaning twice a year removes the plaque and calculus left from daily hygiene. We can also gauge the health of your teeth and determine if tooth decay or gum disease may be developing.

If you would like more information on tooth decay prevention, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay: How to Assess Your Risk.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
November 03, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TaylorHicksIShouldHaveWornaMouthguard

Some train intensively for months ahead of time, so they can achieve peak performance during the season; others simply enjoy occasional pick-up games with friends. But here’s something all athletes, both amateurs and professionals, should know: Dental accidents in sports can happen at any time, and the consequences of not wearing the proper protective equipment can be serious.

Don’t believe us? Just ask American Idol season 5 winner Taylor Hicks. Before his singing career took off, Hicks was a high-school basketball star; he lost his two front teeth during a championship game.

“It was just one of those collisions that happen in sports,” Hicks recently told Dear Doctor magazine. “I never wore a mouthguard in basketball. Obviously I should have.”

We agree. And we want to remind you that basketball isn’t the only game that poses a risk to your teeth (although statistics show it’s the leading cause of sports-related dental injuries). Soccer, bike riding, and equestrian sports — along with some two dozen other games and physical activities — are all on the American Dental Association’s list of sports in which participants should wear a mouthguard.

What’s the best kind of mouthguard? The answer is: the one you actually wear. For the maximum comfort and protection, there’s nothing like a custom-fitted mouthguard provided by our office. This is a piece of protective equipment that’s individually crafted just for you — in fact, it’s made from a model of you own teeth! Not only will it fit your mouth perfectly, but it’s also strong, lightweight and easy to wear.

It’s true that off-the-shelf mouthguards are available from big-box retailers in limited sizes (like small, medium and large); also available are the so-called “boil and bite” types, which you soften in hot water before molding them into shape with the pressure of your fingers, teeth and tongue. Either one of these options is probably better than nothing — but neither provides the level of protection and comfort that a custom-made mouthguard offers.

When you consider the potential cost of tooth replacement — not just its hefty price tag, but also the lost time, trouble and inconvenience it can cause — we think you’ll agree that a perfectly fitted mouthguard, made by our office, is a piece of sports equipment you really can’t afford to do without. Best of all, its cost is quite reasonable.

So if you’re the active type, come in to ask us about fitting you with a custom mouthguard. For more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”




Naperville, IL Dentist
Advance Family Dental Care
1567 N Aurora Road, Ste 143
Naperville, IL 60563
(630) 358-9899
Dentist in Naperville, IL Call For Pricing

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