Posts for: February, 2015

By Advance Family Dental Care
February 27, 2015
Category: Oral Health
DidYouKnowFebruaryIsNationalChildrensDentalHealthMonth

Every February, the American Dental Association sponsors a campaign called National Children’s Dental Health Month. The purpose of this operation is to raise awareness about how important it is to get an early start on developing good dental hygiene habits — and how this can lead to a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums. So we thought this might be a good time to answer some of the most frequently asked questions about how to do exactly that:

When is it time to start cleaning my baby’s teeth?
As soon as you see one! The earlier your child gets used to a daily dental hygiene routine, the better. Baby teeth that have not fully emerged from beneath the gums can be wiped with a clean, moist washcloth after feedings. A tooth that has grown in completely should be brushed twice daily (once in the morning and once in the evening) with a soft, child-sized tooth brush and a thin smear of fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride is an important weapon against tooth decay, but you don’t want your child to swallow too much.

Can babies get cavities?
Absolutely — especially if they are allowed to fall asleep routinely with a bottle filled with anything but water. Milk, formula — even breast milk — all contain sugars that should not be left to pool around your baby’s teeth during sleep, facilitating decay. Juice is an even bigger no-no because it is not only sugary but also acidic.

Can’t I give my child sweets once in a while?
We realize total avoidance of sweets may not be realistic, as beneficial as this would be for your child’s teeth. If you are going to allow your child to have sweets once in a while, better that the treat be given immediately following a meal, and not as a between-meal snack. Soda should really be avoided completely — it’s that bad.

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first time?
The experts say: Get it done in year one. That’s right — even though your child won’t have many teeth by age 1, there’s a lot we can do at that first visit to ensure good oral health now and well into the future. We will do everything possible to make sure your little one has a positive first experience in the dental chair; this helps set the tone for the many important preventive visits yet to come. It’s also a great opportunity for you to ask any specific questions you may have, and receive hands-on instruction on how to care for your child’s teeth and gums.

If you would like more information about children’s oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids” and “Age One Dental Visit.”


By Advance Family Dental Care
February 19, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

Find out more about dental implants and what it takes to get them in Naperville.

By now you’ve probably heard a little bit about dental implants, the permanent solution for tooth loss; however, how much do you really know about this popular dental treatment? Dental implants offer a host of wonderful benefits to patients who are ideal Dental Implantscandidates, but what makes a dental implant work and what are the different components made of?

What is a dental implant?

A dental implant is a small post that acts as a tooth’s root by being placed into the jawbone of the socket of the missing tooth. This is a permanent solution for replacing one, several or even all of your missing teeth.

What makes up a dental implant and what is it made of?

A dental implant consists of three parts: the implant itself, an abutment and an artificial tooth. The implant is usually made from titanium and resembles a small screw or metal post. This is the part that will be surgically placed into either the upper or lower jawbone, depending on where your missing tooth is.

Then an abutment is attached to the top of the implant with a screw. An abutment is often made from either titanium, gold or even porcelain. The purpose of an abutment is to hold the dental crown to the implant.

Lastly, an artificial tooth is cemented onto the abutment. This dental restoration is also a dental crown, so it will be most likely be made from porcelain to offer a natural-looking artificial tooth.

How do I get dental implants?

The surgical process does take a while and it will depend on where you are getting your implants and how many you are getting. The quickest length of treatment is about five months to replace teeth on the lower jaw and about six months for the upper jaw; however, it can easily take about a year to complete this entire process.

During surgery a hole is drilled into the jawbone and the implant is placed directly into the hole, after which the incision is sutured up and given time to heal. Over the course of several weeks the bone and tissue surrounding the implant will begin to fuse with the metal to secure the implant in the jawbone.

After the healing process is over, we will open up the gums and place an abutment over the implant. The abutment’s main purpose is to hold the dental crown is place. Lastly, the crown is secured to the abutment to complete your smile.

Are dental implants right for me?

If you are an adult who is a non-smoker and in good health, dental implants could be a good fit for you. To find out more about getting dental implants in Naperville, then it’s time to schedule a consultation with Dr. Pirooz Zomorrodi at Advance Family Dental Care. Let us get you one step closer to a more radiant smile.


By Advance Family Dental Care
February 19, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
FindingtheRightBacterialBalanceforOptimumOralHealth

By the time you reach adulthood, roughly 100 trillion microscopic organisms will have taken up residence in and on your body, outnumbering your own cells 10 to 1. Most are bacteria, a domain of the animal kingdom considered synonymous with disease. But only a few of the thousands of bacterial species cause us harm; the rest are either benign or actually beneficial to our health, including in our mouths.

Dentistry pioneered much of our knowledge about bacteria, developing processes used to identify, classify and understand those species inhabiting our mouths. Science as a whole is catching up with the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) begun in 2007. Through HMP, researchers have catalogued and begun to study more than 10,000 bacterial species.

We’re finding that our bodies develop a symbiotic relationship with many of these creatures invisible to the naked eye. During our infancy the bacteria we ingest from birth and breast feeding begin to interact with our body’s immune system, “teaching” it to refrain from attacking friendly organisms that contribute to health and searching and destroying enemy species that cause disease.

We’re also learning that an imbalance with our individual population of bacteria has links with disease. Our digestive system is a prime example: bacteria related to obesity can overpopulate our digestive tract, while malnutrition can create an environment that produces too many bacteria that inhibit digestion of vitamins and other nutrients.

The same microbial imbalance can occur in the mouth. For example, our typical Western diet encourages the growth of bacteria most associated with tooth decay (Streptococcus mutans). We’re also finding that tobacco smoking creates a mouth environment more conducive to the bacteria that cause gum disease. Just by quitting smoking you can alter that environment to encourage growth of health-promoting bacteria and inhibit growth of malevolent species.

The desired outcome of this knowledge is to develop treatments that target disease-causing bacteria without harming those beneficial to us (as often occurs with traditional antibiotics). In dentistry, such possibilities could help stop the spread of tooth decay, gum disease or similar bacterial infections, while fostering a healthier oral environment that prevents disease and protects health.

If you would like more information on healthy aspects of bacteria, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Advance Family Dental Care
February 11, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DentalImplantSurgeryisaRoutineWorry-FreeProcedure

Dental implantation is the premier option for tooth replacement available today. While acquiring dental implants does involve a surgical procedure, don’t let that deter you — with proper preparation the procedure is relatively minor and routine.

Implants are root replacements inserted directly into the jawbone to which a life-like, artificial crown is secured (strategically placed implants can also support fixed bridges or removable dentures). They’re typically made of titanium, which is osseophilic or “bone-loving”: bone will grow and adhere to the implant over a few weeks time.

Pre-planning can help minimize discomfort during and after the implantation procedure. We first conduct a radiographic examination of the site with x-rays or CT imaging; this enables us to assess the site’s bone quality and quantity. We can also create a surgical guide from the imaging to pinpoint the precise location for an implant to ensure a successful outcome.

Before beginning the procedure, we numb the area with a local anesthesia (we can also administer a sedative or other relaxation medication if you’re experiencing mild apprehension). The procedure often begins by creating a flap opening in the gum tissue with a few small incisions to access the bone. Using the surgical guide, we then begin a drilling sequence into the bone that progressively increases the size of the hole until it precisely matches the size and shape of the implant.

When the site preparation is complete, we remove the implant from its sterile packaging (which minimizes the chance of infection) and immediately insert it into the prepared site. We verify proper positioning with more x-rays and then suture the flap opening of the gum tissue back into place.

Thanks to both the pre-planning and care taken during surgery, you should only experience minimal discomfort. While narcotic pain relievers like codeine or hydrocodone may be prescribed, most often non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or ibuprofen are all that’s needed. We may also prescribe an anti-bacterial mouthrinse (with chlorhexidine) to assist healing.

In just a few weeks your custom-made restorations will be attached to the implants. It’s the completion of a long but not difficult journey; the resulting smile transformation, though, can last for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”


GoodOralHygieneMadeAlltheDifferenceforBallroomDanceStarCherylBurke

Growing up with a dentist stepdad, Cheryl Burke of Dancing with the Stars heard a lot over the years about the importance of good oral hygiene — in particular, the benefits of using dental floss.

“My dad would say, ‘make sure you floss,’ but I never really listened to him. I was very, very stubborn,” Cheryl told Dear Doctor magazine recently in an exclusive interview. Cheryl admits this stubbornness took its toll, in the form of tooth decay. “I definitely had my share of cavities,” Cheryl recalled.

Cavities can form when food particles, particularly sugar and carbohydrates, are not effectively cleaned from the spaces between teeth. These particles are then broken down by bacteria naturally present in the mouth, resulting in the production of acids that attack the tooth enamel.

When she reached her twenties, Cheryl decided she really needed to step up her oral hygiene and cultivate an asset so important to a professional dancer: a beautiful smile. And once she did, cavities became a distant memory.

“I think when you do floss frequently, it helps to reduce the chances of getting cavities,” Cheryl said. “It took me a while to figure it out.” Now Cheryl flosses after every meal. “I carry floss with me wherever I go. I have no shame busting out my floss in the middle of a restaurant!” She declared.

Dental decay is actually a worldwide epidemic, especially among kids. Untreated, it can lead to pain, tooth loss, and, because it is an infectious disease, it may even have more serious systemic (whole body) health consequences. The good thing is that it is entirely preventable through good oral hygiene at home and regular professional cleanings here at the office.

If it has been a while since you or your children have seen us for a cleaning and check-up, or you just want to learn more about preventing tooth decay, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Cheryl Burke, please see “Cheryl Burke.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Tooth Decay: The World's Oldest & Most Widespread Disease.”




Naperville, IL Dentist
Advance Family Dental Care
1567 N Aurora Road, Ste 143
Naperville, IL 60563
(630) 358-9899
Dentist in Naperville, IL Call For Pricing

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